Links Roundup #34: Tidbits from around the web.

saddle and rope

Have the recent changes to Evernote’s pricing structure left you less than enamored with it as your go-to organization tool?  Michael Hyatt, who has written often on his use of Evernote, recently took a second look at several of Evernote’s top competitors and created a great comparison review in his article: Three Evernote Alternatives and How They Stack Up.

Also, our favorite folks at Evernote were busy taking notes for us at the 2017 SXSW Conference. Check their notebook here for highlights from the 30+ sessions in the Workplace Track discussing topics on workplace productivity and diversity.  My favorite note was from Carmen Medina’s talk, “Update Your Critical Thinking Skills”, where she says “Whatever information comes to us, we believe that it’s an accurate representation of reality when in fact it’s just the information we’ve received.”  Doesn’t that elegantly describe every Googling University Student you’ve ever met?

Next we turn to Podcasts.  For those of you who love to listen to podcasts while exercising or commuting, Bonnie Stachowiak offers her Podcast Greats for 2017.  While Bonnie’s list focuses on Teaching and Higher Ed, Kylie, a brand new librarian, listed her favorite librarian podcasts recently on her blog. If you are trying to find podcasts for your library users, Nicole Hennig has discusses ways to find Diverse and Accessible Podcasts in her recent Dispatches article in American Libraries.

The gurus at The Next Web reviewed the Best Chrome Extensions to Boost Your Productivity in 2017. And while LifeHacker and Tom’s Guide both reviewed the best Firefox add-ons last year, Mozilla is reminding us that they will be transferring from add-on features to WebExtensions by the end of this year.

Do you use the Public Folder option in your Dropbox in order to share files with others?  If so, this alert is for you!  Dropbox has announced that they will discontinuing their public folder options.  Individuals can share individual files by using a shared link. The public links were to quit working on March 15th.  See all the details here.

And finally, a shameless personal plug.  My article, “The Use of Visual Tools in the Academic Research Process: A Literature Review” was published this month in the Journal of Academic Librarianship (volume 43, Issue 2).  To quote from my own abstract,

“A number of visual tools including concept mappers and mind mappers are well suited to help advanced students, faculty, researchers and librarians to organize the ideas and knowledge throughout the various stages of complex research, from envisioning an idea to the early stages of actively researching and documenting research findings. This paper will discuss the potential uses of visual mapping tools and review the current state of academic literature surrounding the topics of mind mapping and concept mapping.”

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