Links Roundup #25

saddle and ropeCitation/Reference/Bibliographic Management

We have mentioned ReadCube before, which adds some interesting tools for managing PDFs for research, including things like turning references into live links where possible.  They have a PDF on the features of the software, including its Word-compatible citation tool, and a comparison chart with its features compared with EndNote, Mendeley, Zotero, and Papers.  It is a great chart, though I would always take such with a grain of salt for two reasons (1) any chart produced by one software is likely to have some bias; and (2) the features of this type of software change all the time.

Cloud Storage

Wappwolf has three products that work similarly to IFTTT, but on a more limited basis.  They connect your cloud storage (Dropbox or Google Drive or Box) to other web services such as Facebook, Flickr, or Evernote.  The range of actions for documents, audio, images, etc. is amazing.  Scroll down on each page to see the list of actions.

Content Curation

Nicole Hennig, who is just da bomb on apps for learning, has a Pinterest board Content Curation with Mobile Apps.  She has a website, Best Sites for Academics, and an ebook Apps for Librarians, and you can sign up for her email newsletter.

Content Curation Survey 2014 by Christian Puricelli is a slideshow illustrating the answers to a survey.  He got results from 282 content curators.

Digital Pens

Here is a pen to watch for, the N2 which has a kickstarter campaign in Australia.  It looks like it can do much that the Livescribe pen (the market leader in digital pens) can do, but it doesn’t need special paper.  Caveats include:  when will it be available, will it be available outside of Australia and how soon, price, and a better comparison of features to Livescribe.

Educational Technology

The Dawn of the Digital Classroom is a post by Jared Carrizales, of Mighty Skins (which produces skins for electronic devices).  The post provides an infographic that summarizes the positive views both college students and faculty have towards electronics, with students having almost seven devices each!  More importantly, both faculty and students have positive views of the value of online learning.

Evernote/OneNote/Note-Taking Software

Evernote Lovers: Now You Can Create an Email Newsletter in Evernote is an article by Kira M. Newman in Tech Cocktail (an email newsletter for startups) discussing an email marketing tool created by Mastodon which works within Evernote.  The article has screenshots of how to create and send the newsletter.  The service uses a freemium model, with the paid version costing between $10-$35 a month.

The New, Beautiful Evernote Web is a blog post from the company’s official blog (by Andrew Sinkov) about the new interface designed to be simpler and less cluttered.

Evernote has also announced a premium feature called Context, which searches for related information from your notes, from selected external sources, and, for Evernote Business users, notes from your team.

Garth Scaysbrook is an author who writes a lot about Evernote (see a short review of his Evernote book).  His blog has a number of useful short tips, amply illustrated with screen shots.  Two useful examples are Evernote: How to Search Within a Note and Evernote Quick Tip: Insert Date and Time.  Another useful quick tip is Navigate Notes Back and Forward Shortcut.

Create Watch Folders to Easily Store Files in Your Evernote Account is a post in Lifehacker by Tori Reid.  It discusses a VERY important new feature in Evernote for Windows – you can create a folder in Windows, then click on “Import Folder” in the tools menu in Evernote.  Now everything you add to that folder will be automatically added to Evernote in whatever notebook you specify.  This can be a huge help, especially for academic researchers.  Article mentions there is a Mac script that can do the same thing.  The Lifehacer article links to the official Evernote blog post with step-by-step instructions.

I have included many posts from Evernote’s Going Paperless Ambassador, Jamie Todd Rubin, in these link roundups.  Sadly he will not be posting these on a regular basis anymore.  He will, however, still post occasionally.  For now, he has a post that serves as a table of contents for his posts on how to organize Evernote.  He also has a post that serves as a TOC for his posts on searching Evernote.  The third in this series is his roundup posts on productivity tips using Evernote.

Using Evernote in the Classroom is a recent Profhacker post that doesn’t itself have much new, but links to a couple of other resources including Raul Pacheco-Vega’s public notebook of using Evernote in academia.

Why Evernote is Amazing: A Collection of Articles, Blog Posts, Tutorials, and Ideas for Making Evernote Your Best Friend Ever is a board in Storify that is just what it says.  ;-).  Good collection, though would like the date to have shown on the list.  Categories are Why You Should Consider Using Evernote; Video Overview of What Evernote Can Do; Basic Beginner’s Guides; Moving Beyond the Basics; Ideas for Using Evernote; Evernote for School and Research; and For Advanced Users.

 Goals/Habit Tracking

Building Habits and Routines is a Profhacker post by Anastasia Salter.  She discusses how easy it is to lose track of these at the beginning of a semester, and mentions the app she is currently using to track them is Way of Life(iOS only).  I looked on the Google Play store, and there are a number of Android apps that do something similar, like Habit Bull.

Learning Tools

Huzzah!  The new Top 100 Tools for Learning is now available!  The annual survey has been around since 2007, compiled by the excellent Jane Hart.

Productivity

The Projecteze System Keeps You Productive With Just a Word Processor by is a Lifehacker post by Mihir Patkar on creating a 4 column table in Word or Google Docs, for example, with columns for project name, due date, priority, and action items.

Scanning

Scanbot is an app for iOS and Android that does crisp scans, multiple page scans, recognizes QR codes and barcodes, allows annotating PDFs including uploading your signature, automatic uploading to a variety of cloud services including Dropbox and Evernote, and more.

Twitter

How to Save Tweets to Evernote is another useful post from Catherine Pope in The Digital Researcher blog.  She describes two different methods for the task.  Many academics use Twitter to create communities discussing research.  Pope, by the way, has ebooks available on using Scrivener for research (see below), both Mac and Windows editions, using Evernote for research (Windows and Mac), and using Zotero to manage references.

Writing

Scholarly Writing Hacks: 5 Lessons I Learned by Writing Every Day in June is a Profhacker article by Jennifer Ahern-Dodson that is described by its title.  Good tips for those who want to get in the habit of writing regularly.

How to Create a Content Brainstorming Dashboard to Keep Ideas Coming is an excellent article by Ann Smarty in Small Business Trends.  First mentions a couple of apps (I just use Evernote and keep a bin list), but then a number of techniques.  One I like is to step away from a project for a time… when I am writing a blog post, I first do the research, then don’t look at it again for a day or so.  When I come back to it, usually the organization of the writing of the post has suggested itself to my mind.

How to Write Your Thesis with Scrivener is an ebook written by Catherine Pope of The Digital Researcher blog.  I have been so impressed with her writing and organization, so I expect this is a really good book.  The first link is for the Windows version, and she also has a Mac version.  Both are available as Kindle versions for $4.99.  Scrivener is a popular writing tool for academics.

 

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