Integrative Services: Time Savers Extraordinaire

The internet is full of silos – web sites or services that don’t play well with others.  Whether you’re retrieving or disseminating information, this requires a lot of duplication of effort.  Librarians and researchers are especially aware of this problem, simply due to the number of databases that must be searched to get a comprehensive view of the literature on a topic.  First federated searching and then web-scale discovery services were attempts to get around the problem and provide a simple interface to information scattered across many silos that require subscriptions.

But the open web has its silos too.  Both work and personal life may require using various social media such as twitter or facebook.  To get the same information on different sites required multiple data entry.  This is beginning to change in ways that will become more and more useful as time goes on.

My first real awareness of this phenomena was the blogging platform Posterous.  It allowed you to make the same information available on numerous web services.  For example, I had my personal blog set up to post simultaneously to Posterous, Blogger, facebook, twitter, and Live Journal.

So I was very impressed when I found iffft, the service that allows integration of many services through the use of recipes that trigger actions.  For example, photos you send to facebook can be sent automatically to Dropbox or Evernote, as can a WordPress blog post.  An upcoming Tuesday tool tip will focus on iffft and include more on using it to perform some tasks more efficiently.

Other products that I haven’t used are doing something similar. Hootsuite integrates social media and more, while there are products similar to iffft that are aimed at business users. Hojoki integrates cloud apps, and sends an a daily and weekly email summarizing your recent uses of these. on{x} (I hate that name) is similar to ifttt and allows you to remotely program an Android phone using a JavaScript API.

I’m the type of person who is more likely to notice the big picture rather than the details – just call me Meta Mary – so I find this an exciting trend that augers much for the future.  Being able to automate yet control how one interacts with the flood of information available (and constantly growing) will be helpful in dealing with information overload.  If anyone has come up with a name for such services I’m not aware of it, so I’m calling them integrative web services.  Corning has made compelling videos about such a future with their “A Day Made of Glass” and “Day Made of Glass 2″ videos – while it focuses on devices, notice how smoothly simple the interfaces they use are:

Day Made of Glass [YouTube videos have not been working for me in Firefox, but are working in IE]:

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Day Made of Glass 2:

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